Review the case you selected and consider the potential accountability of the Internet site (Facebook or Craigslist) for the crime committed. Kathleen Edward (2010)

Discussion topics

Discussion 2
For this Discussion, select one of the following cases: Kathleen Edward or Philip Markoff. Review the case you selected and consider the potential accountability of the Internet site (Facebook or Craigslist) for the crime committed.
Kathleen Edward (2010)
Kathleen Edward of Trenton, Michigan, was a 7-year-old girl dying of Huntington’s disease. As she battled her disease, she was subjected to cyber-bullying by her 33-year-old neighbor, Jennifer Petkov. Petkov used her Facebook page to post hateful messages, such as “I can’t wait until you die,” and ghoulish art of Kathleen, including Kathleen’s face under a skull and crossbones. Petkov also posted a doctored picture of Kathleen’s mother,who had died a year earlier of Huntington’s disease, being held by the Grim Reaper. Eventually a restraining order was placed against Petkov.
Philip Markoff (2009)
Philip Markoff was a Boston University medical student who became known as the “Craigslist Killer.” This was primarily because he found his victims via their advertisements posted on Craigslist. Markoff utilized this Internet site to contact his victims, such as Julissa Brisman, a masseuse found dead in a hotel room after her appointment with Markoff. He robbed and attacked two other women he connected with via the use of Craigslist before getting caught. He committed suicide while in jail awaiting trial.
Post by Day 4 the name of the case you selected. Then provide your position on the degree to which the Internet site should be held accountable for the crimes that occurred using the site.
Reference
Article: Hunter, A. (2010, October 13). Dying girl Kathleen Edward cyberbullied by 33-year-old neighbor: Why? CBS News. Retrieved from http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-504763 162-20019377-10391704.html
Article: McPhee, M., Schabner, D., & Battiste, N. (2010, August 15). ‘Craigslist Killer’ Philip Markoff commits suicide. ABC News. Retrieved from http://abcnews.go.com/US/craigslist-killer-phillip-markoff-commits-suicide/story?id=11405484

 
Discussion 3
For this Discussion, examine the seriousness of white-collar crimes and consider why they are not included in the FBI’s annual Uniform Crime Reports.
Post by Day 4 to this Discussion. Examine the seriousness of white-collar crimes and consider why they are not included in the FBI’s annual Uniform Crime Reports.
Reference
Readings
• Course Text: Taylor, R. W., Fritsch, E. J., & Liederbach, J. (2015). Digital crime and digital terrorism. (3rd ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.
o Chapter 6, “White-Collar Crimes”
• Article: Barnett, C. (n.d.). The measurement of white-collar crime using Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) data. Retrieved December 15, 2011, from U.S. Department of Justice, Federal Bureau of Investigation website: http://www.fbi.gov/about-us/cjis/ucr/nibrs/nibrs wcc.pdf
• Article: Croall, H. (2009). White-collar crime, consumers and victimization. Crime, Law and Social Change, 51(1), 127–146.
Retrieved from the Walden Library using the SocINDEX with Full Text database.
• Article: Cullen, F. T., Hartman, J. L., & Jonson, C. L. (2009). Bad guys: Why the public supports punishing white-collar offenders. Crime, Law and Social Change, 51(1), 31–44.
Retrieved from the Walden Library using the SocINDEX with Full Text database.
• Article: Gottschalk, P., & Solli-Saether, H. (2010). Computer information systems in financial crime investigations. Journal of Computer Information Systems, 50(3), 41–49.
Retrieved from the Walden Library using the Business Source Premier database.
• Article: Green, B. (2010). Thinking about white-collar crime and punishment. Criminal Justice, 25(3), 1–5.
Retrieved from the Walden Library using the ProQuest Central database.
• Article: Levi, M. (2008). White-collar, organised and cyber crimes in the media: Some contrasts and similarities. Crime, Law and Social Change, 49(5), 365–377.
Retrieved from the Walden Library using the SocINDEX with Full Text database.
• Article: U.S. Department of Justice, Federal Bureau of Investigation. (2011). Uniform Crime Report: Crime in the United States, 2010: About the Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program. Retrieved from http://www.fbi.gov/about-us/cjis/ucr/crime-in-the-u.s/2010/crime-in-the-u.s.-2010/aboutucrmain

 
Discussion 5
For this Discussion, select a current piece of U.S. legislation related to regulation of intellectual property. Consider how the legislation you select may be applied in a social media forum.
Post by Day 4 a description of the piece of legislation you selected. Then explain how this legislation may be applied in a social media forum. Finally, explain how social media might contribute to intellectual property theft.
Reference
Readings
• Course Text: Taylor, R. W., Fritsch, E. J., & Liederbach, J. (2015). Digital crime and digital terrorism. (3rd ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.
o Chapter 11, “Law Enforcement Roles and Responses”
• Article: Coenen, R. D., Greenberg, J. H., & Reisinger, P. K. (2011). Intellectual property crimes. American Criminal Law Review, 48(2), 849–903.
Retrieved from the Walden Library using the Expanded Academic ASAP database.
• Article: McCuistion, J. G. (2011). Culpable discord: Defining the limitations of contributory liability in Internet-based file sharing. The University of Memphis Law Review, 41(3), 597–635.
Retrieved from the Walden Library using the ProQuest Central database.
• Article: Sullivan, B. (2011, May 24). That famous space shuttle photo: When is sharing stealing? [Web log post]. The Red Tape Chronicles on msnbc.com. Retrieved from http://redtape.nbcnews.com/_news/2011/05/24/6703177-that-famous-space-shuttle-photo-when-is-sharing-stealing
• Article: Yeh, B. T. (2008). Intellectual property rights violations: Federal civil remedies and criminal penalties related to copyrights, trademarks, and patents (CRS Report for Congress RL34109). Retrieved from http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/RL34109.pdf
• Article: Yu, P. K. (2011). Digital copyright and confuzzling rhetoric. Vanderbilt Journal of Entertainment and Technology Law, 13(4), 881–939.
Retrieved from the Walden Library using the Academic Search Complete database.
Web Resources
• U.S. Department of Justice, Computer Crime & Intellectual Property Section. (n.d.). Reporting computer, Internet-related, or intellectual property crime. Retrieved December 15, 2011, from http://www.justice.gov/actioncenter/crime.html
• U.S. Department of Justice, Computer Crime & Intellectual Property Section, Criminal Division (2006). Prosecuting intellectual property crimes (3rd ed.). Retrieved from http://www.justice.gov/criminal/cybercrime/docs/prosecuting_ip_crimes_manual_2013.pdf

Discussion 6
For this Discussion, review the Megan Meier case and current legislation on cyber-bullying outlined in “Guarding against a Radical Redefinition of Liability for Internet Misrepresentation: The United States v. Drew Prosecution and the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act.” Consider how the outcome for the offender in the case might be different if the crime was to occur today.
Post by Day 4 an explanation of how the outcome might be different for the offender in the Megan Meier case if the offense happened today. Support your response with references to current cyber-bullying legislation and/or rulings on current cyber-bullying cases.
Reference
Readings
• Course Text:Taylor, R. W., Fritsch, E. J., & Liederbach, J. (2015). Digital crime and digital terrorism. (3rd ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.
o Chapter 8, “Sex Crimes, Victimization, and Obscenity on the World Wide Web”
• Article: Cooley, A. H. (2011). Guarding against a radical redefinition of liability for Internet misrepresentation: The United States v. Drew prosecution and the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act. Journal of Internet Law, 14(8), 1, 15–28.
Retrieved from the Walden Library using the Business Source Complete database.
• Article: Drogin, E. Y., & Young, K. (2008). Forensic mental health aspects of adolescent “cyber bullying”: A jurisprudent science perspective. Journal of Psychiatry & Law, 36(4), 679–690.
Retrieved from the Walden Library using the Academic Search Complete database.
• Article: Gillespie, A. A. (2006). Cyber-bullying and harassment of teenagers: The legal response. Journal of Social Welfare & Family Law, 28(2), 123–136.
Retrieved from the Walden Library using the Academic Search Complete database.
• Article: King, A. V. (2010). Constitutionality of cyberbullying laws: Keeping the online playground safe for both teens and free speech. Vanderbilt Law Review, 63(3), 845–884.
Retrieved from the Walden Library using the Academic Search Complete database.
• Article: McCarthy, T., & Michels, S. (2009, July 2). Lori Drew MySpace suicide hoax conviction thrown out. ABC News. Retrieved from http://abcnews.go.com/TheLaw/story?id=7977226&page=1
• Article: Meredith, J. P. (2010). Combating cyberbullying: Emphasizing education over criminalization. Federal Communications Law Journal, 63(1), 311–340.
Retrieved from the Walden Library using the ProQuest Central database.

 
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