Migration and Sexuality Discussion Assignment: no outside source This week you will read chapter 11 in the text and the Week 11 Article on Latin American

Migration and Sexuality Discussion Assignment: no outside source This week you will read chapter 11 in the text and the Week 11 Article on Latin American Immigrant Women and Intergenerational Sex Education. Please respond to the following questions with one, 600 word post. Response Questions: 1. How is virginity defined by ethno-religious traditions? 2. What is the role of socio-economic status and sexual behaviors? 3. Cite two specific examples of gendered sexual expectations from each reading, chapter 11 and the article in the week 11 folder, and discuss the reasons for these gendered interpretations of sexuality. What are the factors contributing to these standards? Are they fluid- meaning do they have the potential to shift or change overtime? 4. Discuss the role of gender, race and class in defining acceptable sexual behavior and the means by which parents approach their children about sexuality. You can also cite Butler’s video in your response to show the connection between her discussion and the research findings in the readings.Notes, Book and Article uploaded. Copyright © 2003. University of California Press. All rights reserved.
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Gender and U.S. Immigration
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Gender and
U.S. Immigration
Contemporary Trends
EDITED BY
Copyright © 2003. University of California Press. All rights reserved.
Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA PRESS
Berkeley
Los Angeles
London
Gender and U. S. Immigration : Contemporary Trends, edited by Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo, University of
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The following chapters were originally published in American Behavioral Scientist ,
no.  ( Jan. ), ©  by Sage Publications, and are reprinted here by permission
of Sage Publications, Inc.:
Chapter , “Engendering Migration Studies: The Case of New Immigrants in the
United States,” by Patricia R. Pessar, pp. –
Chapter , “The Global Context of Gendered Labor Migration from the Philippines
to the United States,” by James A. Tyner, pp. –
Chapter , “Gender and Labor in Asian Immigrant Families,” by Yen Le Espiritu,
pp. –
Chapter , “The Intersection of Work and Gender: Central American Immigrant
Women and Employment in California,” by Cecilia Menjívar, pp. –
Chapter , “Gendered Ethnicity: Creating a Hindu Indian Identity in the United
States,” by Prema Kurien, pp. –
Chapter , “Engendering Transnational Migration: A Case Study of Salvadorans,”
by Sarah J. Mahler, pp. –
The following chapter was originally published in Signs , no.  (), ©  by
the University of Chicago Press, and is reprinted here by permission of the
University of Chicago Press:
Chapter , “ ‘We Don’t Sleep Around Like White Girls Do’: Family, Culture, and
Gender in Filipina American Lives,” by Yen Le Espiritu, pp. –
Copyright © 2003. University of California Press. All rights reserved.
The following chapter was originally published in Gender & Society  ().
Chapter , “ ‘I’m Here, but I’m There’: The Meanings of Latina Transnational
Motherhood,” by Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo and Ernestine Avila, pp. –.
University of California Press
Berkeley and Los Angeles, California
University of California Press, Ltd.
London, England
©  by the Regents of the University of California
Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data
Gender and U.S. immigration : contemporary trends / edited by Pierrette
Hondagneu-Sotelo.
p. cm.
Some chapters were previously published in various sources.
Includes bibliographical references and index.
 --- (cloth : alk. paper) — --- (pbk. : alk. paper)
. Women immigrants— United States. . United States—Emigration and
immigration. I. Hondagneu-Sotelo, Pierrette.
 . 
.⬘⬘—dc

© Manufactured in the United States of America
       
         
The paper used in this publication meets the minimum requirements of /
.– ( ) (Permanence of Paper).A
Gender and U. S. Immigration : Contemporary Trends, edited by Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo, University of
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Copyright © 2003. University of California Press. All rights reserved.
For Mike, with love and appreciation
Gender and U. S. Immigration : Contemporary Trends, edited by Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo, University of
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    


ix
Copyright © 2003. University of California Press. All rights reserved.
 : 
. Gender and Immigration: A Retrospective and Introduction
Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo ⁄ 
. Engendering Migration Studies:
The Case of New Immigrants in the United States
Patricia R. Pessar ⁄ 
. Strategic Instantiations of Gendering in the Global Economy
Saskia Sassen ⁄ 
 :   
. The Global Context of Gendered Labor Migration from
the Philippines to the United States
James A. Tyner ⁄ 
. Gender and Labor in Asian Immigrant Families
Yen Le Espiritu ⁄ 
. The Intersection of Work and Gender: Central American Immigrant
Women and Employment in California
Cecilia Menjívar ⁄ 
. Israeli and Russian Jews: Gendered Perspectives on
Settlement and Return Migration
Steven J. Gold ⁄ 
Gender and U. S. Immigration : Contemporary Trends, edited by Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo, University of
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viii

 :     
. Gendered Ethnicity: Creating a Hindu Indian Identity in the United States
Prema Kurien ⁄ 
. Disentangling Race-Gender Work Experiences:
Second-Generation Caribbean Young Adults in New York City
Nancy Lopez ⁄ 
. Gendered Geographies of Home: Mapping Secondand Third-Generation Puerto Ricans’ Sense of Home
Maura I. Toro-Morn and Marixsa Alicea ⁄ 
 : , ,  
. De madres a hijas: Gendered Lessons on Virginity across Generations
of Mexican Immigrant Women
Gloria González-López ⁄ 
. Raising Children, and Growing Up, across National Borders: Comparative
Perspectives on Age, Gender, and Migration
Barrie Thorne, Marjorie Faulstich Orellana, Wan Shun Eva Lam, and Anna Chee ⁄ 
. “We Don’t Sleep Around Like White Girls Do”: Family, Culture, and
Gender in Filipina American Lives
Yen Le Espiritu ⁄ 
Copyright © 2003. University of California Press. All rights reserved.
 : , ,   
. Engendering Transnational Migration:
A Case Study of Salvadorans
Sarah J. Mahler ⁄ 
. “I’m Here, but I’m There”:
The Meanings of Latina Transnational Motherhood
Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo and Ernestine Avila ⁄ 
. Gender, Status, and the State in Transnational Spaces: The Gendering
of Political Participation and Mexican Hometown Associations
Luin Goldring ⁄ 
. “The Blue Passport”: Gender and the Social Process
of Naturalization among Dominican Immigrants in New York City
Audrey Singer and Greta Gilbertson ⁄ 

 ⁄ 


Gender and U. S. Immigration : Contemporary Trends, edited by Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo, University of
California Press, 2003. ProQuest Ebook Central, http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/qc-ebooks/detail.action?docID=227296.
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Copyright © 2003. University of California Press. All rights reserved.
       
This book brings together research by a diverse array of social science scholars
seeking to understand new developments in gender and U.S. immigration. The volume began when I was invited by a journal to serve as guest editor for a special issue on gender and migration to the United States; six of the articles that originally
appeared in the American Behavioral Scientist ( January ) are reproduced here. I
subsequently invited other scholars working in diverse communities at the intersections of gender and immigration to contribute to this book. I thank this talented
group of social scientists for their hard work, their commitment to this project, their
close attention to detail in the revision process, and for their patience. Although
we never came together in a conference format to discuss our respective projects,
our ideas and words have migrated across space and time. We are a community
bound by similar interests, and I hope the dialogue will continue and expand to
include others.
I am also grateful to my students at the University of Southern California for
their inspiration and interests in many of the themes discussed in this volume. In
particular, I wish to acknowledge Fajima Bedran, Belinda Lum, and Akiko Yasuike,
graduate students who participated in a directed reading group where we read and
discussed many of the initial drafts that appear here. Belinda Lum deserves special thanks. At the tail end of this project, she helped keep me on track with her
incredible organizational skills and computer wizardry. She’s amazing!
Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo
ix
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    
Copyright © 2003. University of California Press. All rights reserved.
Introduction
Gender and U. S. Immigration : Contemporary Trends, edited by Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo, University of
California Press, 2003. ProQuest Ebook Central, http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/qc-ebooks/detail.action?docID=227296.
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 
Gender and Immigration
A Retrospective and Introduction
Copyright © 2003. University of California Press. All rights reserved.
Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo
The intent of this volume is both modest and ambitious. High-caliber social science research has emerged on gender and U.S.-bound immigration in recent years,
and this book simply draws together some of the best new work in the field. The
book includes essays by pioneers who have logged nearly two decades in the field
of gender and immigration, and new empirical work by both young scholars and
well-established social scientists who bring their substantial talents to this topic for
the first time. More ambitiously, this volume seeks to alert scholars and students to
some of the gender consequences emerging from the last three decades of resurgent U.S. immigration. This immigration is changing life as we know it, in the
United States and elsewhere, in many ways. One important change concerns the
place of women and men in society.
I felt a need to put together this book because of the continued silence on gender in the contemporary social science literature on U.S. immigration. A glance at
the main journals and at recent edited volumes on American immigration and international migration reveals that basic concepts such as sex, gender, power, privilege, and sexual discrimination only rarely enter the vocabulary or research design
of immigration research. This is puzzling. Gender is one of the fundamental social relations anchoring and shaping immigration patterns, and immigration is one
of the most powerful forces disrupting and realigning everyday life. It is my hope
that the chapters in this volume will earn the recognition they deserve, spur a wider
conversation about immigration and how it is changing social life for women and
men, and prompt immigration scholars to design research that acknowledges the
gendered social world in which we live.

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 -
Copyright © 2003. University of California Press. All rights reserved.
THE EMERGENCE OF IMMIGRATION SCHOLARSHIP
AND GENDER STUDIES
During the s and s, the social sciences experienced major transformations.
Among the most notable were two separate developments: the growth in feministoriented scholarship and immigration research. The establishment of women’s
studies programs and research derived from the second-wave feminist movement,
which emerged in the s to advocate equality for women. Feminist research
called attention to the unequal power relations between women and men in society and illuminated and analyzed how women’s and men’s actions, positions, and
relative privileges in society are socially constructed in ways that tend to favor men.
Since then, we have witnessed a shift away from the premise of a unitary notion of
“women” or “men” to an increasingly accepted perspective that acknowledges how
the multiplicities of masculinities and femininities are interconnected, relational,
and, most important, enmeshed in relations of class, race, and nation. Globalization, immigration, and transnationalism are significant sites for contemporary inquiries of gender.
The growth in immigration research derived not from a social movement like
feminism, but from the massive increase in literal human movement across borders
during the late th century. Today, it is estimated that as many as  million people live in nations other than those in which they were born. Only a small portion
of these millions have come to the United States, although many Americans believe that the whole world has descended on their country. U.S. immigrants have
reached unprecedented numbers—about  million according to the  census—
but this constitutes only about % of the total U.S. population, a smaller percentage than we saw earlier in the th century. Immigration is certainly nothing new
for the United States—it is, after all, foundational to the national narrative—but the
resurgence of immigration during the last three decades has taken many Americans
by surprise. Prompted by global restructuring and post–World War II U.S. military,
political, and economic involvement throughout Asia, the Caribbean, and Latin
America, and facilitated by the  amendment to the McCarran-Walter Immigration Act, which erased national origin quotas that had previously excluded Asians,
U.S. immigration picked up in the s and shows few signs of diminishing.
In the s and s, immigration to the United States from Asia, Latin America, and the Caribbean increased dramatically. These contemporary immigrants
are a diverse lot. Among them are refugees and preliterate peasants as well as urbane, highly educated professionals and entrepreneurs. Although a fairly constant
barrage of restrictionist, nativist, and blatantly xenophobic campaigns and legislation has raised tremendous obstacles to these newcomers, the number of legal
permanent residents—those who can be legally admitted to live and work in the
United States—has steadily increased in the s. Nearly one million immigrants
are now granted legal permanent residency status each year. Immigrants and their
children today constitute about one fifth of the U.S. population, and the percent-
Gender and U. S. Immigration : Contemporary Trends, edited by Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo, University of
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  

ages are much higher in cities such as Los Angeles, New York, and Miami, where
immigrants concentrate.
Different dimensions of immigrant social life are threaded by the dynamics of
gender, and this volume exposes some of the complex ways in which these threads
are woven. The chapters cover a range of topics, including the way gender informs
the sexual practices and values among immigrant parents and their adolescent
daughters, transnational political group participation, household divisions of labor,
naturalization, and even our definition of childhood. Readers of this volume will
gain insight into the lives of immigrants as diverse as affluent, cosmopolitan Indian
Hindu professionals and relatively poor, undocumented, and modestly schooled
manual workers from El Salvador and Mexico. All of the contributors to these chapters recognize that gender does not exist in a vacuum but emerges together with particular matrices of race relations, nation, occupational incorporation, and socioeconomic class locations, and the analyses reflect nuances of intersectionality.
Distinct approaches and areas of concern, which correspond to different stages
of development, have characterized the gender and immigration scholarship. While
the periodization is not nearly as linear as I present it below, glancing back at these
legacies will allow us to better situate the cont…
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