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Liberty University The Bible and Coaching in Human Resources Paper see attached not to hard ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,…………..

Liberty University The Bible and Coaching in Human Resources Paper see attached not to hard ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,…………….write 1-2 paragraphs on my portion which is coaching BUSI 644
FAITH INTEGRATION: THREAD GRADING RUBRIC
You are to briefly describe how the Bible is related to the topics covered in the course. An integration of the Bible must be explicitly shown in
relation to a course topic in order to receive points. In addition, at least 2 other outside scholarly sources (the text may count as 1) should be used to
substantiate the group’s position.
GROUP:
Criteri
a
Thread
:
85
Points
(10
points)
Main Thread – Levels of Achievement
Content
70%
Advanced
Proficient
Developing
Not Present
10 points
9 to 8 points
7 to 1 points
0 points
Key
All key components Most key
Compon of the essay prompt components of the
are answered in the essay are answered
ents
essay.
15 to 14 points
(15
points)
Biblical Integration of how
integrati the Bible relates to
on
course topics is
present throughout
all of the essay.
in the essay.
13 points
Integration of how
the Bible relates to
course topics is
present throughout
most of the essay.
Some key
components of the
essay are answered
in the essay.
12 to 1 points
Integration of how
the Bible relates to
course topics is
present throughout
some of the essay.
Point
s
Earn
ed
No key components
of the essay are
answered in the
essay.
0 points
No integration of
how the Bible
relates to course
topics was present
in the essay.
Page !1 of !4
BUSI 644
(30
points)
Support
for
major
points
30 to 28 points
27 to 25 points
24 to 1 points
0 points
Major points are
supported by all of
the following:
• Textbook, with
in-text citations
and reference;
and
• Two articles from
peer-reviewed
journals, with intext citations and
references; and
• The Bible; and
• Good examples
(pertinent,
conceptual, or
personal
examples are
acceptable); and
• Thoughtful
analysis
Major points are
supported by most
of the following:
• Textbook, with
in-text citations
and reference;
and
• Two articles from
peer-reviewed
journals, with intext citations and
references; and
• The Bible; and
• Good examples
(pertinent,
conceptual, or
personal
examples are
acceptable); and
• Thoughtful
analysis
Major points are
supported by some
of the following:
• Textbook, with intext citations and
reference; and
• Two articles from
peer-reviewed
journals, with intext citations and
references; and
• The Bible; and
• Good examples
(pertinent,
conceptual, or
personal examples
are acceptable);
and
• Thoughtful
analysis
Major points are
supported by none
of the following:
• Textbook, with
in-text citations
and reference;
and
• Two articles from
peer-reviewed
journals, with intext citations and
references; and
• The Bible; and
• Good examples
(pertinent,
conceptual, or
personal
examples are
acceptable); and
• Thoughtful
analysis
Page !2 of !4
BUSI 644
Criteri
a
Content
70%
Main Thread – Levels of Achievement
5 points
(5
points)
Criteri
a
Clear,
logical
flow to
essay
3 to 1 points
0 points
A clear, logical flow
is present
throughout all of
the essay.
A clear, logical flow A clear, logical flow A clear, logical flow
is present
is present in some of is not present in the
throughout most of the essay.
essay.
the essay.
Essay was
submitted to (1)
SafeAssign and (2)
Forum.
Essay was
submitted to (1)
SafeAssign and (2)
Forum.
Essay was not
Essay was submitted
submitted to (1)
to (1) SafeAssign
SafeAssign and/or
and (2) Forum.
(2) Forum.
Main Thread – Levels of Achievement
Structur
e
30%
Advanced
(10
points)
4 points
APA
Format
Proficient
10 points
9 to 8 points
All in-text citations Between 1 – 2 APA
and references are formatting errors
typed in the APA
are present.
format. Zero errors
are present.
A title page is
The essay begins
provided; a
with a title page
reference page is
and ends with a
provided.
reference page,
both in the APA
format.
Developing
Not Present
Point
s
Earn
ed
7 to 1 points
0 points
Between 3 – 4 APA More than 4 APA
formatting errors
formatting errors
are present.
are present; or the
APA format was
not followed.
A title page is
incomplete or
missing; a
reference page is
incomplete or
missing.
Page !3 of !4
BUSI 644
(10
points)
Word
Count
(5
points)
Spelling
and
Gramma
r
10 points
9 to 8 points
The essay is at
The essay is at
least 1,000 original least 950 original
words in length.
words in length.
7 to 1 points
0 points
The essay is at least The essay is less
900 original words than 900 original
in length.
words in length.
5 points
Correct spelling,
grammar, and
punctuation are
used.
3 to 1 points
Between 3–4
spelling, grammar,
and punctuation
errors are present.
4 points
Between 1–2
spelling, grammar,
and punctuation
errors are present.
0 points
More than 4
spelling, grammar,
and punctuation
errors are present.
Total Points:
Instructor Comments:
Page !4 of !4
Human Resource
Development
TALENT DEVELOPMENT
SEVENTH EDITION
Jon M. Werner
Australia • Brazil • Mexico • Singapore • United Kingdom • United States
Human Resource Development: Talent
Development, Seventh Edition
Jon M. Werner
SVP, General Manager for Social Sciences,
Humanities & Business: Erin Joyner
© 2017, © 2012 Cengage Learning®
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ISBN: 978-1-337-29653-3
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Printed in the United States of America
Print Number: 01
Print Year: 2016
For Barbara
“Pass on what you heard from me … to reliable leaders who are competent
to teach others.” (II Timothy 2:2; Message translation)
With special thanks to
Randy L. Desimone
Rhode Island College
for his invaluable contributions to past editions.
Brief Contents
Preface xx
PART 1 FOUNDATIONS OF HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT
1 INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT
2 INFLUENCES ON EMPLOYEE BEHAVIOR 36
3 LEARNING AND HRD 72
1
2
PART 2 FRAMEWORK FOR HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT 117
4
5
6
7
ASSESSING HRD NEEDS 118
DESIGNING EFFECTIVE HRD PROGRAMS
154
IMPLEMENTING HRD PROGRAMS 182
EVALUATING HRD PROGRAMS 222
PART 3 HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT APPLICATIONS 277
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
ONBOARDING: EMPLOYEE SOCIALIZATION AND ORIENTATION 278
SKILLS AND TECHNICAL TRAINING 314
COACHING AND PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT 350
EMPLOYEE COUNSELING, WELL-BEING, AND WELLNESS
CAREER MANAGEMENT AND DEVELOPMENT
MANAGEMENT DEVELOPMENT 484
430
ORGANIZATION DEVELOPMENT AND CHANGE 528
HRD AND DIVERSITY: DIVERSITY TRAINING AND BEYOND 576
Glossary 612
Index 628
iv
388
Contents
Preface xx
PART 1 FOUNDATIONS OF HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT
1
1
INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT 2
INTRODUCTION 4
THE PROGRESSION TOWARD A FIELD OF HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT 5
Early Apprenticeship Training Programs 5
Early Vocational Education Programs 6
Early Factory Schools 6
Early Training Programs for Semiskilled and Unskilled Workers 7
The Human Relations Movement 7
The Establishment of the Training Profession 7
Emergence of Human Resource Development 8
THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT AND HRD/TRAINING 8
Secondary HRM Functions 10
Line versus Staff Authority 10
HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT FUNCTIONS 10
Training and Development (T&D) 10
Career Development 11
Organization Development 11
An Updated “Learning and Performance Wheel” 12
Strategic Management and HRD 13
The Supervisor’s Role in HRD 15
Organizational Structure of the HRD Function 15
v
vi
Contents
ROLES AND COMPETENCIES OF AN HRD PROFESSIONAL 16
The HRD Executive/Manager 17
Other HRD Roles and Outputs for HRD Professionals 18
Certification and Education for HRD Professionals 19
CHALLENGES TO ORGANIZATIONS AND TO HRD PROFESSIONALS 21
Competing in a Turbulent Global Economy 21
Addressing the Skills Gap 22
Increasing Workforce Diversity 22
The Need for Lifelong Learning 23
Facilitating Organizational Learning 23
Addressing Ethical Dilemmas 24
A FRAMEWORK FOR THE HRD PROCESS 24
Needs Assessment Phase 25
Design Phase 26
Implementation Phase 27
Evaluation Phase 27
ORGANIZATION OF THE TEXT 27
SUMMARY 29
QUESTIONS FOR DISCUSSION 30
EXERCISE: INTERVIEW AN HRD PROFESSIONAL 30
SUMMARIES AND QUESTIONS FOR BUSINESS INSIGHTS READINGS 30
NOTES 31
2
INFLUENCES ON EMPLOYEE BEHAVIOR 36
INTRODUCTION 38
MODEL OF EMPLOYEE BEHAVIOR 38
Major Categories of Employee Behavior 39
EXTERNAL INFLUENCES ON EMPLOYEE BEHAVIOR 40
Factors in the External Environment 40
Factors in the Work Environment 41
MOTIVATION: A FUNDAMENTAL INTERNAL INFLUENCE ON EMPLOYEE BEHAVIOR 46
Need-Based Theories of Motivation 47
Cognitive Process Theories of Motivation 49
Reinforcement Theory: A Noncognitive Theory of Motivation 54
Summary of Motivation 55
Contents
OTHER INTERNAL FACTORS THAT INFLUENCE EMPLOYEE BEHAVIOR 58
Attitudes 58
Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities 59
SUMMARY 60
QUESTIONS FOR DISCUSSION 61
EXERCISE 1: INCREASING EMPLOYEE MOTIVATION 62
EXERCISE 2: MOTIVATION THEORIES AND YOU 62
SUMMARIES AND QUESTIONS FOR BUSINESS INSIGHTS READINGS 63
NOTES 64
3
LEARNING AND HRD 72
INTRODUCTION 74
LEARNING AND INSTRUCTION 75
The Search for Basic Learning Principles 75
Limits of Learning Principles in Improving Training Design 76
The Impact of Instructional and Cognitive Psychology on Learning Research 76
MAXIMIZING LEARNING 77
Trainee Characteristics 77
Training Design 81
Retention of What Is Learned 84
Transfer of Training 85
A NEW FOCUS ON INFORMAL LEARNING 88
INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES IN THE LEARNING PROCESS 88
Rate of Progress 89
Attribute-Treatment Interaction (ATI) 90
Training Adult and Older Workers 91
LEARNING STYLES AND STRATEGIES 94
Kolb’s Learning Styles 94
Learning Strategies 96
Perceptual Preferences 96
FURTHER CONTRIBUTIONS FROM INSTRUCTIONAL AND COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY 97
The ACT*/ACT-R Approach to Learning Procedural Skills 97
Learning to Regulate One’s Own Behavior 98
Expert and Exceptional Performance 99
Gagné’s Theory of Instruction 100
vii
viii
Contents
SUMMARY 103
QUESTIONS FOR DISCUSSION 104
EXERCISE 1: LEARNING STYLES 105
EXERCISE 2: VARK QUESTIONNAIRE 105
SUMMARIES AND QUESTIONS FOR BUSINESS INSIGHTS READINGS 105
NOTES 106
PART 2 FRAMEWORK FOR HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT
4
ASSESSING HRD NEEDS 118
INTRODUCTION 119
Definition and Purposes of Needs Assessment 121
What Is a Training or HRD Need? 122
Levels of Needs Analysis 123
STRATEGIC/ORGANIZATIONAL ANALYSIS 123
Components of a Strategic/Organizational Needs Analysis 124
Advantages of Conducting a Strategic/Organizational Analysis 125
Methods of Strategic/Organizational Analysis 126
TASK ANALYSIS 128
The Task Analysis Process 129
An Example of a Task Analysis: Texas Instruments 132
A Task Analysis Approach at Boeing 133
Summary of Task Analysis 133
PERSON ANALYSIS 134
Components of Person Analysis 134
Performance Appraisal in the Person Analysis Process 134
Developmental Needs 138
The Employee as a Source of Needs Assessment Information 139
The “Benchmarks” Specialized Person Analysis Instrument 139
COMPETENCY MODELING 139
PRIORITIZING HRD NEEDS 140
Participation in the Prioritization Process 140
The HRD Advisory Committee 140
THE HRD PROCESS MODEL DEBATE 141
How Technology Changes Needs Assessment 143
SUMMARY 144
QUESTIONS FOR DISCUSSION 144
117
Contents
EXERCISE: CONDUCTING A TASK ANALYSIS 145
INTEGRATIVE CASE: CATHAY PACIFIC AIRWAYS 145
SUMMARIES AND QUESTIONS FOR BUSINESS INSIGHTS READINGS 146
NOTES 147
5
DESIGNING EFFECTIVE HRD PROGRAMS 154
INTRODUCTION 155
DEFINING THE OBJECTIVES OF THE HRD INTERVENTION 158
THE “MAKE-VERSUS-BUY” DECISION: CREATING OR PURCHASING HRD PROGRAMS 162
SELECTING THE TRAINER 164
Train-the-Trainer Programs 165
Preparing a Lesson Plan 166
SELECTING TRAINING METHODS AND MEDIA 167
PREPARING TRAINING MATERIALS 171
Program Announcements 171
Program Outlines 172
Training Manuals or Textbooks 172
SCHEDULING AN HRD PROGRAM 173
Scheduling during Work Hours 173
Scheduling after Work Hours 174
Registration and Enrollment Issues 174
SUMMARY 176
QUESTIONS FOR DISCUSSION 176
EXERCISE 1: OBJECTIVE WRITING FOR A DIVERSITY TRAINING PROGRAM 177
EXERCISE 2: OBJECTIVE WRITING AND DESIGN DECISIONS FOR A TRAINING PROGRAM
OF YOUR CHOICE 177
SUMMARIES AND QUESTIONS FOR BUSINESS INSIGHTS READINGS 177
NOTES 178
6
IMPLEMENTING HRD PROGRAMS 182
INTRODUCTION 183
TRAINING DELIVERY METHODS 184
ON-THE-JOB TRAINING (OJT) METHODS 186
JOB INSTRUCTION TRAINING (JIT) 188
Job Rotation 189
CLASSROOM TRAINING APPROACHES 190
ix
x
Contents
THE LECTURE APPROACH 190
THE DISCUSSION METHOD 191
AUDIOVISUAL MEDIA 192
Experiential Methods 196
PROMOTING LEARNER REFLECTION 201
COMPUTER-BASED TRAINING (CLASSROOM-BASED) 201
SELF-PACED/COMPUTER-BASED TRAINING MEDIA AND METHODS 202
SOME FINAL ISSUES CONCERNING TRAINING PROGRAM IMPLEMENTATION 205
ARRANGING THE PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT 206
GETTING STARTED 208
SUMMARY 210
QUESTIONS FOR DISCUSSION 211
EXERCISE 1: GENERATING QUESTIONS TO USE WHEN LEADING A DISCUSSION 211
EXERCISE 2: DESIGNING E-LEARNING MATERIALS 212
INTEGRATIVE CASE: HSBC’S CLIMATE CHAMPIONS PROGRAMME 212
SUMMARIES AND QUESTIONS FOR BUSINESS INSIGHTS READINGS 212
NOTES 213
7
EVALUATING HRD PROGRAMS 222
INTRODUCTION 223
THE DEFINITION AND PURPOSE OF HRD EVALUATION 225
HOW OFTEN ARE HRD PROGRAMS EVALUATED? 226
THE EVALUATION OF TRAINING AND HRD PROGRAMS PRIOR TO PURCHASE 226
CHANGING EVALUATION EMPHASES 227
MODELS AND FRAMEWORKS OF EVALUATION 227
KIRKPATRICK’S EVALUATION FRAMEWORK 227
OTHER FRAMEWORKS OR MODELS OF EVALUATION 229
COMPARING EVALUATION FRAMEWORKS 230
A STAKEHOLDER APPROACH TO TRAINING EVALUATION 233
DATA COLLECTION FOR HRD EVALUATION 235
DATA COLLECTION METHODS 235
CHOOSING DATA COLLECTION METHODS 237
TYPES OF DATA 238
THE USE OF SELF-REPORT DATA 239
RESEARCH DESIGN 239
ETHICAL ISSUES CONCERNING EVALUATION RESEARCH 242
Confidentiality 242
Contents
Informed Consent 242
Withholding Training 242
Use of Deception 243
Pressure to Produce Positive Results 243
ASSESSING THE IMPACT OF HRD PROGRAMS IN MONETARY TERMS 243
Evaluation of Training Costs 244
HOW TECHNOLOGY IMPACTS HRD EVALUATION 250
CLOSING COMMENTS ON HRD EVALUATION 252
SUMMARY 253
QUESTIONS FOR DISCUSSION 254
EXERCISE: CALCULATING THE COSTS AND BENEFITS OF TRAINING 255
INTEGRATIVE CASE: WHAT WENT WRONG AT UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL? 256
APPENDIX 7-1 MORE ON RESEARCH DESIGN
257
RESEARCH DESIGN VALIDITY 257
NONEXPERIMENTAL DESIGNS 258
Case Study 259
Relational Research 259
One-Group Pretest–Post-Test Design 259
Reconsideration of Nonexperimental Research Designs 260
EXPERIMENTAL DESIGNS 261
Pretest–Post-Test with Control Design 261
Post-Test-Only with Control Design 261
Solomon Four-Group Design 262
QUASI-EXPERIMENTAL DESIGNS 263
Nonequivalent Control Group Design 263
Time Series Design 263
STATISTICAL POWER: ENSURING THAT A CHANGE WILL BE DETECTED IF ONE EXISTS 264
SELECTING A RESEARCH DESIGN 265
SUMMARIES AND QUESTIONS FOR BUSINESS INSIGHTS READINGS 267
NOTES 267
PART 3 HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT APPLICATIONS 277
8
ONBOARDING: EMPLOYEE SOCIALIZATION AND ORIENTATION 278
INTRODUCTION 280
SOCIALIZATION: THE PROCESS OF BECOMING AN INSIDER 281
Some Fundamental Concepts of Socialization 281
xi
xii
Contents
VARIOUS PERSPECTIVES ON THE SOCIALIZATION PROCESS 285
Stage Models of Socialization 285
People Processing Tactics and Strategies 287
Newcomers as Proactive Information Seekers 287
What Do Newcomers Need? 288
THE REALISTIC JOB PREVIEW 289
How Realistic Job Previews Are Used 291
Are Realistic Job Previews Effective? 292
Employee Orientation Programs 293
Assessment and the Determination of Orientation Program Content 294
Orientation Roles 295
Designing and Implementing an Employee Orientation Program 300
Evaluation of Orientation Program Effectiveness 301
SUMMARY 304
QUESTIONS FOR DISCUSSION 304
EXERCISE: DESIGNING A TECHNOLOGY-ENHANCED ORIENTATION PROGRAM 305
SUMMARIES AND QUESTIONS FOR BUSINESS INSIGHTS READINGS 305
NOTES 306
9
SKILLS AND TECHNICAL TRAINING 314
INTRODUCTION 315
BASIC WORKPLACE COMPETENCIES 316
BASIC SKILLS/LITERACY PROGRAMS 317
Addressing Illiteracy in the Workplace 318
Designing an In-House Basic Skills/Literacy Program 318
Federal Support for Basic Skills Training 319
TECHNICAL TRAINING 321
Apprenticeship Training Programs 321
Computer Training Programs 322
Technical Skills/Knowledge Training 323
Safety Training 324
Quality Training 327
INTERPERSONAL SKILLS TRAINING 330
Sales Training 331
Customer Relations/Service Training 331
Team Building/Training 333
Contents
ROLE OF LABOR UNIONS IN SKILLS AND TECHNICAL TRAINING PROGRAMS 335
Joint Training Programs 335
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND EDUCATION 336
Continuing Education at Colleges and Universities 337
Continuing Education by Professional Associations 337
Company-Sponsored Continuing Education 338
HRD Departments’ Role in Continuing Education 338
SUMMARY 339
QUESTIONS FOR DISCUSSION 340
EXERCISE: EVALUATING A CLASS PROJECT TEAM 340
SUMMARIES AND QUESTIONS FOR BUSINESS INSIGHTS READINGS 341
NOTES 341
10
COACHING AND PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT 350
INTRODUCTION 352
THE NEED FOR COACHING 352
COACHING: A POSITIVE APPROACH TO MANAGING PERFORMANCE 353
COACHING AND PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT 353
DEFINITION OF COACHING 355
ROLE OF THE SUPERVISOR AND MANAGER IN COACHING 356
THE HRD PROFESSIONAL’S ROLE IN COACHING 356
COACHING TO IMPROVE POOR PERFORMANCE 357
DEFINING POOR PERFORMANCE 357
RESPONDING TO POOR PERFORMANCE 359
CONDUCTING THE COACHING ANALYSIS 360
The Coaching Discussion 363
MAINTAINING EFFECTIVE PERFORMANCE AND ENCOURAGING SUPERIOR PERFORMANCE 367
SKILLS NECESSARY FOR EFFECTIVE COACHING 367
THE EFFECTIVENESS OF COACHING 370
EMPLOYEE PARTICIPATION IN DISCUSSION 371
BEING SUPPORTIVE 371
USING CONSTRUCTIVE CRITICISM 371
SETTING PERFORMANCE GOALS DURING DISCUSSION 372
TRAINING AND THE SUPERVISOR’S CREDIBILITY 372
ORGANIZATIONAL SUPPORT 372
xiii
xiv
Contents
CLOSING COMMENTS ON COACHING AND PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT 372
Technology, Coaching, and Performance Management 373
SUMMARY 376
QUESTIONS FOR DISCUSSION 377
EXERCISE 1: DESIGN YOUR OWN PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM 378
EXERCISE 2: CONDUCT A PERFORMANCE REVIEW MEETING 378
SUMMARIES AND QUESTIONS FOR BUSINESS INSIGHTS READINGS 378
NOTES 379
11
EMPLOYEE COUNSELING, WELL-BEING, AND WELLNESS 388
INTRODUCTION 389
Employee Counseling as an HRD Activity 391
The Link between Employee Counseling and Coaching 391
AN OVERVIEW OF EMPLOYEE COUNSELING PROGRAMS 392
Components of a Typical Program 392
Who Provides the Service? 393
Characteristics of Effective Employee Counseling …
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