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NUR 3846 Howard Educational Strategy in Nursing Professional Development Research Please summarize the attached articles and complete in APA format . Must

NUR 3846 Howard Educational Strategy in Nursing Professional Development Research Please summarize the attached articles and complete in APA format . Must be at least 200 words JNPD
Journal for Nurses in Professional Development & Volume 31, Number 2, 62Y72 & Copyright B 2015 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.
Reflection as an Educational Strategy
in Nursing Professional Development
2.5 ANCC
Contact
Hours
An Integrative Review
Robbin Miraglia, MSN, RN
ƒ
Marilyn E. Asselin, PhD, RN-BC
Reflection is a critical component of professional nursing
practice and a strategy for learning through practice. This
integrative review synthesizes the literature addressing the
use of reflection as an educational strategy and reports
outcomes from the use of reflective strategies. Reflection
education is primarily nested in programs to meet specific
clinical goals, structured with group facilitation. Findings
suggest that reflective strategies stimulate learning in
practice, enhance readiness to apply new knowledge,
and promote practice change.
INTRODUCTION
In recent years, reflection has gained increased recognition
as a critical component of professional nursing practice and
as an educational strategy to acquire knowledge and learn
through practice (Asselin & Fain, 2013; Kim, 1999; Perry,
2000). Although there is no agreed upon definition, reflection is generally understood as the deliberate process of
critically thinking about a clinical experience, which leads
to development of insights for potential practice change
(Asselin & Fain, 2013). Scholars contend that reflection offers nurses the opportunity to build on existing knowledge
through clinical experiences (Johns, 1995; Kuiper & Pesut,
2004; Perry, 2000), develop clinical judgment (Nielsen,
Stragnell, & Jester, 2007; Tanner, 2006), promote strong
communication skills, build collaborative practice, and improve patient care (Horton-Deutsch, 2012; Peden-McAlpine,
Tomlinson, Forneris, Genck, & Meiers, 2005).
Although it is generally assumed that nurses know how
to reflect, findings from recent studies suggest that nurses’
reflective thinking may be prolonged by pauses and they
may need assistance in systematically moving insights to
Robbin Miraglia, MSN, RN, is Doctoral Student, College of Nursing,
University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, North Dartmouth, and Clinical
Educator, Beverly Hospital, Massachusetts.
Marilyn E. Asselin, PhD, RN-BC, is Associate Professor, College of
Nursing, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, North Dartmouth.
The authors have disclosed that they have no significant relationship with,
or financial interest in, any commercial companies pertaining to this article.
ADDRESS FOR CORRESPONDENCE: Robbin Miraglia, MSN, RN, 292
Putnam Street, Danvers, MA 01923 (e
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